Early August Pasture Restoration Update

This year we are working hard to revitalize our existing pastures and to restore some old and unused pastures.  This means we’ve planted 250 baby trees around the entire property in small groves of 3 to 5, we’ve found the old fence line, cleared it, and have successfully re-fenced over half of it in one block, and we’ve been grazing less frequently & refraining from mowing in our existing pastures.

So, how is that working out for us so far?
Great!  Continue reading

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Parasite Management & Supplements

Years ago we learned that Native Americans used pumpkin to cure kidney infections and rid the body of worms, and the leaves of the pumpkins may be crushed and rubbed on as a fly repellent. Not only this but pumpkins are safe for livestock to eat.  So we contacted some friends who had a pumpkin patch and asked if after the pumpkin patch season was over if we could buy some of their left overs.  They were thrilled to have someone help clean up the unwanted pumpkins and when we returned home with pickup truck loads of pumpkin we were delighted to find that the flock was equally delighted to have fresh pumpkin!  That winter we made sure they had a steady supply of pumpkins in their feed area.  With each new pumpkin they made games of rolling it around and breaking it open.

But, fresh pumpkin is a seasonal thing.  And what is actually helping with parasite management in the digestive tract is a compound found in the pumpkin seed called cucurbitin.  Cucurbitin affects parasites by paralyzing them so they can no longer attach to the body and they are expelled from the digestive tract naturally.  Continue reading

Pasture Rotation and Grass Compaction

An old idea in our home is the concept of leaving the grazing animals in their paddock long enough to “force them to eat it all” before moving on.  This is one concept that came from the big ranches up north where my husband spent his early 20’s working as a ranch hand.  Before going overseas, and when we had more cows than we do now,  when I was busy with the children and not as involved in the livestock side of things as I am now, this was a statement that was often heard.

However, we’ve restructured our small farm and I’m the primary “farmer” while the hubby works long days with an intense commute!  Even before I became the sole farmer in the family, we had moved away from the “make them eat it all” concept.

As you can see, they have left a nice amount of foliage behind and this is okay!  We are building soil and harvesting the grass via our grazing livestock who recycle the grass back into the soil.  Our perspective has changed over the years and we are excited to see how our land and our animals will respond to our evolving concepts.

The same concepts at work with the poultry, though in this location the grass is so tall that the birds simply cannot graze it.  Their tractors sailing through this sea of reeds is pressing the grass down and compacting it with the top dressing of manure.

They are almost at the grassy nole where the juvenile hens will be able to explore outside of their tractor for the first time.  The water trough for the cows are just across the fence from this little nole and the older hens will do their work with the manure left in the alley way.  While they reside on this little nole they will add their manure to the straw strewn about as a cover over the sparse grass that is growing in the sandy soil here.  This will not be their permanent home for the grazing season, just for a little while as they help build some soil in this location and move on to another spot.

 

TWO Weeks Update – 5/16

Boy, spring gets busy!  This is our regular weekly update but it spans two weeks.  In the past two weeks we’ve planted the garden, moved the greenhouse from the house down to the garden (with a nice foundation and a crushed gravel floor!), the cows have come down from their winter pasture and we’ve added a new cow and a bull to the small herd, and we got the big yards mowed (for our area and this wet spring, this is a big deal!).  I hope to write brief updates on each of the flocks/herds below but I also have one or two other entries planned.  Let’s see if I can pull all of this off!

Poultry:
Last Monday the Broilers moved outside at 4 weeks old.  I’m grateful for the delay in posting because it causes me to LOOK at how they’ve grown in the past 8 days – quite a bit!
The video was taken the day they moved out of the brooding house and into their tractor.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chXw49_LpJU Continue reading

Spring Grass Rotation & Supplements

When grazing animals on spring grass it is not uncommon for their manure to get quite runny.  This digestive upset can’t feel very good.   Some time ago it was recommended to me to add apple cider vinegar to the water when moving them to fresh grass in an effort to help reduce any digestive upset and the super watery manure.  I did notice positive results with the cattle two years ago and because of that I have added ACV to the water tubs whenever I change their feed.

When rotating the animals through their grazing paddocks, it’s critical to remember the “take half, leave half” principle.  Graze no more than half of the foliage leaf length and move on.  This helps the grass and other forage plants to continue their growth and rebound from the grazing period faster.  To take more than half of the plant seriously damages the plant at the root level, so “take half, leave half” every time.

The kelp we’ve been offering free choice to the flock has been very well received.  We are using Throvin Kelp.

Thursday, March 16

I’ve been told I should video-blog, and I’m strongly considering it since I don’t have as much time as I once did when I wrote more.  So I’m going to give it a shot.
Besides, it’s more fun to SEE what’s going on than just hear about it.  Right?  😉

For now, I’m going to play with how to upload a video and share it here while I’m uploading my video from last week.